Jacksonville Speeding Tickets and Tickets for Driving Slowly

Florida Ticket LawyerWhen you receive a Jacksonville speeding ticket, this is a moving violation. A conviction will put points on your driving record. Too many points on your driving record will lead to a Florida drivers license suspension. It could also lead to an increase in insurance rates. A Jacksonville traffic ticket lawyer may be able to help you avoid this. To speak to a Jacksonville ticket attorney, call (904) 564-2525.

Florida’s traffic laws requires drivers to travel at a safe speed. Florida Statute Section 316.183(1) states:

“No person shall drive a vehicle on a highway at a speed greater than is reasonable and prudent under the conditions and having regard to the actual and potential hazards then existing. In every event, speed shall be controlled as may be necessary to avoid colliding with any person, vehicle, or other conveyance or object on or entering the highway in compliance with legal requirements and the duty of all persons to use due care.”

Florida’s speed limits are set in accordance with Section 316.183(2). This law explains how the maximum speed limits are determined for streets and highways, ranging from residential neighborhoods to interstate highways. Florida Statute Section 316.183(2) provides:

“On all streets or highways, the maximum speed limits for all vehicles must be 30 miles per hour in business or residence districts, and 55 miles per hour at any time at all other locations. However, with respect to a residence district, a county or municipality may set a maximum speed limit of 20 or 25 miles per hour on local streets and highways after an investigation determines that such a limit is reasonable. It is not necessary to conduct a separate investigation for each residence district. The minimum speed limit on all highways that comprise a part of the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways and have not fewer than four lanes is 40 miles per hour, except that when the posted speed limit is 70 miles per hour, the minimum speed limit is 50 miles per hour.”

We all know that you can receive a ticket for speeding in Jacksonville FL, but can you get a ticket for slow driving? There are a couple of laws that prohibit driving too slowly. You can receive a ticket in Florida for not driving fast enough. Florida Statute Section 316.183(5) prohibits a person from driving “a motor vehicle at such a slow speed as to impede or block the normal and reasonable movement of traffic, except when reduced speed is necessary for safe operation or in compliance with law.” A violation of this law may not be criminal, but it is a moving violation.

There is another Florida driving law that permits a police officer to write a ticket to a driver for driving too slowly. Section 316.081 of the Florida Statutes requires slower drivers to drive in the right lane. Section 316.081(2) states:

“Upon all roadways, any vehicle proceeding at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall be driven in the right-hand lane then available for traffic or as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway except when overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction or when preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.”

This same Florida driving law prohibits slow drivers from remaining in the left-hand lane if he or she is being passed by another vehicle. Section 316.081(3) states:

“On a road, street, or highway having two or more lanes allowing movement in the same direction, a driver may not continue to operate a motor vehicle in the furthermost left-hand lane if the driver knows or reasonably should know that he or she is being overtaken in that lane from the rear by a motor vehicle traveling at a higher rate of speed. This subsection does not apply to drivers operating a vehicle that is overtaking another vehicle proceeding in the same direction, or is preparing for a left turn at an intersection.”

 

Comments are closed.