Florida Burglary Arrest After Man Caught Stealing on Camera

Jacksonville Theft Attorney

Video surveillance in burglary

As a Jacksonville criminal attorney, I have represented people charged with stealing. The charges range from felonies, such as robbery and burglary, to misdemeanors like petty theft and shoplifting in Jacksonville FL. Any type of Jacksonville theft arrest is serious. It will end up on your Florida criminal record. Some charges are worse than others. Burglary is a felony in Florida. There are certain factors that can increase the felony level or degree. For instance, burglary to a structure or conveyance is a third-degree felony, unless the structure or conveyance is occupied. This Florida burglary law states:

“Burglary is a felony of the third degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, if, in the course of committing the offense, the offender does not make an assault or battery and is not and does not become armed with a dangerous weapon or explosive, and the offender enters or remains in a:
(a) Structure, and there is not another person in the structure at the time the offender enters or remains; or
(b) Conveyance, and there is not another person in the conveyance at the time the offender enters or remains.”

If you are arrested after breaking into a house, this is much more serious. Burglary to a dwelling is a second degree felony in Jacksonville FL. Florida Statute Section 810.02(3) states:

“Burglary is a felony of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082, s. 775.083, or s. 775.084, if, in the course of committing the offense, the offender does not make an assault or battery and is not and does not become armed with a dangerous weapon or explosive, and the offender enters or remains in a:
(a) Dwelling, and there is another person in the dwelling at the time the offender enters or remains;
(b) Dwelling, and there is not another person in the dwelling at the time the offender enters or remains;
(c) Structure, and there is another person in the structure at the time the offender enters or remains;
(d) Conveyance, and there is another person in the conveyance at the time the offender enters or remains….”

Even if noone is home, you can be caught and charged with burglary. The obvious example occurs when a person is caught by a neighbor in or around the house. A person may also be caught by possessing the stolen property. People are often caught after selling stolen items to a pawnshop. This will lead to an additional criminal charge known as dealing in stolen property in Jacksonville. Today, I read a news story showing another example.

This case occurred in south Florida. Jacksonville’s Channel 4 News reported:

“A Palm Beach County man caught a burglar in his home from more than 1,000 miles away. Greenacres police say the man was viewing video surveillance of his home on his cellphone when he saw someone enter his home while he was away in New York.

 He alerted his neighbor, who called police.

 Officers arrested 18-year-old Steven Enrique. Police say he had about $800 worth of jewelry from the home in his possession.”

Stealing $800 worth of jewelry is considered Florida grand theft. Since this jewelry was stolen from a home, it is burglary to a dwelling and is a more sever crime with harsher penalties. There are also certain sentencing guidelines that apply in burglary cases.

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