Jacksonville Hit and Run Charges After a Car Accident

Jacksonville Hit and Run

Jacksonville Hit and Run Car Accident

If you are in a car accident in Jacksonville, you have certain duties under Florida’s traffic laws. Chapter 316 of the Florida Statutes applies to traffic cases. If you are involved in hit and run car crash, this is called leaving the scene of an accident. Leaving the Scene of an Accident is normally charged under Florida Statute 316.061. If there is only damage to property and there is no personal injury, the following traffic law makes leaving the car crash a misdemeanor. Depending on the facts of your hit and run car accident, you may be charged under one of the Florida traffic laws described below. If you were involved in a car crash that resulted in a person getting hurt, other Florida traffic laws will apply to your case.  Due to the injuries, your penalties will be much worse. Talk to a Jacksonville Criminal Lawyer for help with your hit and run case. If you have been given a ticket or arrested for a “hit and run” charge, call a Jacksonville leaving the scene of an accident lawyer at (904) 564-2525. You can also email a lawyer in Jacksonville.

Florida Statute Section 316.061 applies to your hit and run crash if there was a person in the other car. This Florida traffic law states:
“The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting only in damage to a vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall immediately stop such vehicle at the scene of such crash or as close thereto as possible, and shall forthwith return to, and in every event shall remain at, the scene of the crash until he or she has fulfilled the requirements of s. 316.062. A person who violates this subsection commits a misdemeanor of the second degree.”

If you are involved in a car accident in Jacksonville, you must stop and give certain information to the other driver. Otherwise, you may be charged with leaving the scene of an accident. Under Florida Statute Section 316.062:
“(1) The driver of any vehicle involved in a crash resulting in injury to or death of any person or damage to any vehicle or other property which is driven or attended by any person shall give his or her name, address, and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall upon request and if available exhibit his or her license or permit to drive.”

What if the car that you hit was empty? In many cases, people accidentally bumped into a parked car. Florida Statute 316.063 covers this scenario:
“The driver of any vehicle which collides with, or is involved in a crash with, any vehicle or other property which is unattended, resulting in any damage to such other vehicle or property, shall immediately stop and shall then and there either locate and notify the operator or owner of the vehicle or other property of the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, or shall attach securely in a conspicuous place in or on the vehicle or other property a written notice giving the driver’s name and address and the registration number of the vehicle he or she is driving, and shall without unnecessary delay notify the nearest office of a duly authorized police authority. Any person who fails to comply with this subsection commits a misdemeanor of the second degree.”

If you were involved in a hit and run and were given a ticket, call a Jacksonville Criminal Defense Attorney immediately. Many people think that this criminal traffic citation is just the same as a Florida speeding ticket. It is not!  A Florida speeding ticket is a civil traffic citation.  Leaving the scene of an accident with property damage is a criminal misdemeanor crime, just like Jacksonville petty theft, Jacksonville domestic battery, and Jacksonville DUI charges. Leaving the scene of an accident will show up on your Florida criminal record. Talk to a Jacksonville lawyer at 20 Miles Law.

 

 

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